Confessions of a Chocoholic

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chocolate

Since childhood, chocolate has been my favourite indulgence. Back then it was sweet, milky, cheap and cheerful but since I’ve cut my sugar intake right back, I’ve turned to the dark side.

You know what they say; chocolate with 85% cocoa solids is more intense so you can be satisfied with just a couple of squares. Yeah, right! The thing is, my hunger and my cravings probably are satisfied by a couple of segments; then my greed gobbles up the rest of the bar. You don’t have to be a nutritionist to know that wolfing down family sized bars is not strictly low carb.

I read about someone who had totally kicked their chocolate habit using this hypnosis track. I clicked and bought it without really thinking, then left it languishing unloved on my itunes playlist and settled down in front of the telly with some Green and Blacks and a mug of coffee. I did listen to the opening bit once in the car but it was all a bit wooo, whale music and relaxation, which didn’t seem terribly safe on the A1.

Last month stress, strains and way too much caffeine were keeping me awake all night and in desperation I thought I’d try the relaxation exercises at the beginning of the track to switch off. Well, they worked. I was spark out before chocolate was even mentioned. I used it a few more times, always fell asleep after the first introductory five to ten minutes, never got to hear the pearls of chocolaty wisdom. Then my sleep improved and I didn’t give it a second thought.

But here’s the thing, I walked past Hotel Chocolat in King’s Cross station today without even going in for a free sample. This is UNPRECEDENTED. And, when I think back, I haven’t eaten chocolate, or even thought about chocolate for three weeks or so. Weird.

So is it placebo, hypnosis or coincidence? The truth is I haven’t a clue but my instinct is that the hypnosis made the difference. That is coming from a confirmed cynic. There is evidence that hypnotherapy, properly delivered can make a real difference in the management of pain, anxiety, depression and phobias. The research is less convincing when it comes to smoking cessation and weight management, with trials showing differing results .

And what about the plethora of apps that have sprung onto the market promising to help us lose weight , quit sugar, stop smoking and be generally fabulous? Well, a review looked at those and most of them have little or no research to back up their claims. Even so, quite a few have a trickle of enthusiastic reports on Amazon from satisfied clients. It seems that apps and recordings have the potential to deliver effective hypnosis but technology may have raced against science, with suppliers so keen to get the products out there that it’s difficult for us to tell the great from the gruesome.

Many scientists recommend that there should be an accreditation system so we can spot the rigorously tested and quality assured apps, which definitely makes sense. In the meantime I’m enjoying a chocolate free existence and hoping it helps my chunky little legs become smooth and slim by the summer.

Hmmmm.

On second thoughts, maybe I should look for an app that will hypnotise me to prefer kale and broccoli to white wine and pistachios. Wish me luck!